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How to watch this week’s rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse

The moon moves in front of the sun in a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse as seen from Tanjung Piai, Malaysia on December 26, 2019.SADIQ ASYRAF / AFP / GETTY IMAGES

How to watch this week’s rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse

Last month’s “super flower blood moon” lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. This week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare “ring of fire” solar eclipse.

Thursday morning, June 10, makes the new moon, which will eclipse the sun at 6:53 a.m. ET. To see it, look to the east. 

On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse.

What is an annular solar eclipse? 

A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun’s light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible.

An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would. 

Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what’s called a “ring of fire” or “ring of light.” 

“As the pair rises higher in the sky, the silhouette of the Moon will gradually shift off the sun to the lower left, allowing more of the Sun to show until the eclipse ends,” NASA said. 

How to watch the annular solar eclipse

The narrow path of the eclipse will be completely visible in parts of Canada, Greenland, the Arctic Ocean and Siberia. It will be partially visible for much of the rest of northeastern North America, Greenland, Northern Europe and northern Asia. 

From the Washington, D.C. area, the moon will block about 80% of the left side of the sun as they rise together in the east-northeast at 5:42 a.m. The sun will appear as a crescent during this time, NASA says. 

“From any one point along this annular solar eclipse path, the middle or annular or ‘ring of fire’ stage of the eclipse lasts a maximum of 3 minutes 51 seconds,” according to EarthSky

The event will conclude around 6:29 a.m. ET. 

It is essential to wear special solar eclipse glasses to protect your eyes while viewing the celestial phenomenon. Looking directly at the sun is dangerous and can damage your eyes.

This is just one of two solar eclipses in 2021. A total solar eclipse will be visible on December 4. 

And don’t worry if you miss it — you can just catch up with a livestream instead. 

NASA releases stunning new pic of Milky Way’s ‘downtown’

NASA releases stunning new pic of Milky Way’s ‘downtown’

This false-color X-ray and radio frequency image made available by NASA on Friday, May 28, 2021 shows threads of superheated gas and magnetic fields at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. X-rays detected by the NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory are in orange, green, blue and purple, and radio data from the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa are shown in lilac and gray. The plane of the galazy is horizontal, in the center of this vertical image. Astronomer Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts Amherst said Friday he spent a year working on this, while stuck at home during the pandemic. (NASA/CXC/UMass/Q.D. Wang, NRF/SARAO/MeerKAT via AP)
This false-color X-ray and radio frequency image made available by NASA on Friday, May 28, 2021 shows threads of superheated gas and magnetic fields at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. X-rays detected by the NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory are in orange, green, blue and purple, and radio data from the MeerKAT radio telescope in South Africa are shown in lilac and gray. The plane of the galazy is horizontal, in the center of this vertical image. Astronomer Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts Amherst said Friday he spent a year working on this, while stuck at home during the pandemic. (NASA/CXC/UMass/Q.D. Wang, NRF/SARAO/MeerKAT via AP)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA has released a stunning new picture of our galaxy’s violent, super-energized “downtown.”

It’s a composite of 370 observations over the past two decades by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory, depicting billions of stars and countless black holes in the center, or heart, of the Milky Way. A radio telescope in South Africa also contributed to the image, for contrast.

Astronomer Daniel Wang of the University of Massachusetts Amherst said Friday he spent a year working on this while stuck at home during the pandemic.

‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse will be visible in North America on June 10

‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse will be visible in North America on June 10

  • The full eclipse will last for roughly an hour and 40 minutes. No part of the U.S. will see the full eclipse.
  • The most ideally situated metropolitan areas to view the partial eclipse at sunrise are Toronto, Philadelphia and New York.
  • Solar eclipse glasses must be worn at all times during an annular or partial solar eclipse to avoid the threat of blindness.
The moon appears to cover the sun during an annular eclipse of the sun on May 20, 2012 as seen from Chaco Culture National Historical Park in Nageezi, Ariz.STAN HONDA, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

The moon blocked out the sun for part of the Earth on Dec. 14, plunging southern Argentina and Chile into darkness.

Just two weeks after a lunar eclipse, skywatchers are in for another treat in June: A “ring of fire” annular solar eclipse will be visible in parts of North America on June 10. 

The path of the eclipse starts at sunrise in Ontario, Canada (on the north side of Lake Superior), then circles across the northern reaches of the globe, EarthSky’s Bruce McClure said. “Midway along the path, the greatest eclipse occurs at local noon in northern Greenland and then swings by the Earth’s North Pole, and finally ends at sunset over northeastern Siberia,” he said.

The full eclipse will last for roughly an hour and 40 minutes. No part of the U.S. will see the full eclipse.

While the U.S. will miss out on the “ring of fire” part of the eclipse, folks who live along the East Coast and in the Upper Midwest will get a chance to see a partial solar eclipse just after sunrise.

How to see the ‘Super Flower Blood Moon,’ 1st lunar eclipse of this decade

In a once in a lifetime event, the night sky on Wednesday will be both the brightest and darkest ever seen.

This week’s full moon will be the second supermoon of the season, appearing brighter and larger than usual. According to the Farmer’s Almanac, the “Flower Blood Moon” will be roughly 222,000 miles away from the Earth early Wednesday morning.

May’s full moon is known as the “Flower Moon,” and because a total lunar eclipse — also known as a “blood moon” as it gives the moon a reddish hue — is also set to happen at the same time, it’s being called the “Super Flower Blood Moon.”https://d-15986500134082916044.ampproject.net/2105072136000/frame.html

The moon will be at its brightest and largest at 4:14 a.m. PT, according to astronomers.

PHOTO: The full moon, known as the 'Super Pink Moon', rises over the skyline of New York City, seen from West Orange, in New Jersey, April 26, 2021. (Eduardo Munoz/Reuters, FILE)
PHOTO: The full moon, known as the ‘Super Pink Moon’, rises over the skyline of New York City, seen from West Orange, in New Jersey, April 26, 2021. (Eduardo Munoz/Reuters, FILE)

With the moon this close to the planet, stargazers in certain parts of the world will get to see an impressive sight.

MORE: Pink moon is 1st supermoon of 2021: When to see it

People who live in western North America, western South America, eastern Asia, and Oceania, will have the best view of the “Flower Blood Moon,” according to astronomers.

“In the U.S., those who are located east of the Mississippi will experience a partial lunar eclipse before the moon sets below the horizon, and those along the East Coast won’t see much of anything, unfortunately,” the Farmer’s Almanac said.

PHOTO: A total lunar eclipse, known as the 'super blood wolf moon,' rises over San Francisco, Jan. 20, 2019. (David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE)
PHOTO: A total lunar eclipse, known as the ‘super blood wolf moon,’ rises over San Francisco, Jan. 20, 2019. (David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images, FILE)

MORE: Supermoon seen from around the world

This will mark the first lunar eclipse of the decade. The last one was recorded on Jan. 21, 2019.

A partial lunar eclipse is also scheduled for Nov. 19, according to astronomers.